Undergraduate Courses

A modern play upon Dante, “Devil May Cry” (2015). Faculty Dante expert: Massimo Ciavolella.

  • For information about specific section times and locations please view the UCLA Schedule of Classes.
  • For a complete listing of department courses visit the UCLA General Catalog.

Courses (Winter 2019)

Comparative Literature 2AW: Survey of Literature: Antiquity to Middle Ages

Instructor: David MacFadyen

Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1A or 4AW. Study of selected texts from antiquity to Middle Ages, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts include works and authors such as OdysseyGilgamesh, Sappho, Greek tragedies, Aeneid, Petronius, Beowulf, Marie de France, Tristan and Iseult1001 NightsPopul Vuh. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

Comparative Literature 2DW: Survey of Literature: Great Books from World at Large

Instructor: Aamir R. Mufti

Study of major literary texts usually overlooked in courses that focus only on canon of Western literature, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts from at least three of following areas read in any given term: African, Caribbean, East Asian, Latin American, and Middle Eastern literature. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

Comparative Literature 4BW: Literature and Writing: Age of Enlightenment to 20th Century

Instructor: Allison Collins

Discussion, four hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1B or 2BW. Study and discussion of selected texts from Middle Ages to 17th century, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts may include works and authors such as Chaucer, Dante’s Divine Comedy, Cervantes’s Don Quixote, Shakespeare, 1001 Nights, Christine de Pizan, Popul Vuh, Molière, and Racine. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading

Comparative Literature 4DW: Literature and Writing: Great Books from World at Large

Instructor: Omar Zahzah

Study and discussion of major literary texts usually overlooked in courses that focus only on canon of Western literature, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts from at least three of following areas read in any given term: African, Caribbean, East Asian, Latin American, and Middle Eastern literature. Texts may include works by authors such as Ngugi, Desai, Kincaid, Emecheta, El Saadawi, Achebe, Pak, Can Xue, Neruda, and Rushdie. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

Comparative Literature 100: Introduction to Literary and Critical Theory

Instructor: Stephanie Bosch Santana

Seminar-style introduction to discipline of comparative literature presented through series of texts illustrative of its formation and practice.

Comparative Literature M101: Hebrew Literature in English: Literary Traditions of Ancient Israel — Bible and Apocrypha

Instructor: Jeremy D. Smoak

(Same as Jewish Studies M150A.) Study of literary culture of ancient Israel through examination of principal compositional strategies of Hebrew Bible and Apocrypha (read in translation).

Comparative Literature M148: Arab Film and Song

Instructor: Nouri Gana

(Same as Arabic M148.) Seminar, three hours. Exploration of conjunctions between contemporary Arab film and song and between popular cultures and cultures of commitment (Iltizam), with possible focus on specific genres such as realist/neorealist Arab film; feminist Arab film or popular Arab film and song; topics such as nation, gender, and representation or democracy and human rights or censorship, reception, and resistance. Possible examination of various national cinemas such as Tunisian, Egyptian, Moroccan, Algerian, and Palestinian. Various musical genres such as Rai, Mizoued, and Hip-hop also examined in relation to emergence not only of national cinemas, national music industries, and iconic singers but also of video clip, satellite TV, star academy, and reality shows — all products of transnational and pan-Arab mass media. P/NP or letter grading.

Comparative Literature M166: Modern Jewish Literature in English: Diaspora Literature

Instructor: The Staff

(Same as Jewish Studies M151A.) Study of literary responses of Jews to modernity, its challenges, and threats. Readings in texts originally written in English or translated from Hebrew, Yiddish, German, Russian, French, and Italian. Analysis of formal aspects of each work.

Comparative Literature 180: Variable Topics: Medical Humanities in Comparative Contexts: Heal Body, Persuade Mind: Relationship between Erotomania, Melancholy, and Nostalgia in Renaissance Culture

Instructor: Massimo Ciavolella

Erotomania, melancholy, and nostalgia share many traits. Throughout history their pathologies have often overlapped, and ambiguity thus created persists today. Medicine, natural philosophy, and literature and philosophy play unique role in this process of distortion and reassignment of meaning. In case of these three ideas, physicians and philosophers have shown indefatigable propensity to explore their boundaries, bring their reciprocal relationships to light and, most importantly, ponder their relevance in terms of physical and mental health of individual. Study focuses on relationship between melancholy and erotomania (amor hereos) in ancient and early modern medical and literary texts, including first text devoted exclusively to study of nostalgia, Johannes Hofer’s Dissertatio Medica de Nostalgia, oder Heimwehe of 1688.

Comparative Literature 180: Variable Topics: Medical Humanities in Comparative Contexts: Mediterranean Medical Traditions: Comparative Perspectives

Instructor: Alain Touwaide

Study devoted to major medical systems produced in ancient Mediterranean world: Greek, Arabic, and medieval/Latin. It follows their tradition from origin to Renaissance (including their linkages and intersections through translations); and compares these system(s) not only to reconstruct their genealogy, but also–if not above all–to possibly answer question of what makes medical system Greek, Arabic, or medieval. Non-Mediterranean traditions and systems (mostly Ayurvedic and Chinese) included as appropriate. Ancient texts read in English translation; knowledge of one or more original-source languages is advantage.

Comparative Literature 191 (Seminar 1): Politics of Translation

Instructor: Omri Asscher

Study and discussion of how translation reflects and reinforces power relations and hierarchies between languages and societies. Exploration of sociocultural aspects of translation, and role of translation in ideological and power relations between groups and nations. Translation, and other mediation processes in movement of literature across cultures, studied as vehicle for transmission of overt and covert messages related to questions of national identity, morals, gender, and religion. Within this framework, special attention given to translation in Israeli and Jewish historical contexts, as prism to both Jewish/non-Jewish and intra-Jewish relations.