Graduate Courses

From the recent Andalusian play, “Clytemnestra. Una mujer.” Faculty expert, Kathleen L. Komar. Banner image: John Locke. Faculty expert, Kirstie McClure.

  • For information about specific section times and locations  please view the UCLA Schedule of Classes.
  • For a complete listing of department courses visit the UCLA General Catalog. The list below was generated in September 2017.

 

Graduate Courses

200A. Theory of Comparative Literature. (6) Seminar, three hours. Study of theory of literature, with emphasis on genealogy of theoretical problems. S/U or letter grading.

200B. Methodology of Comparative Literature. (6) Seminar, three hours. Requisite: course 200A. Study of methodology of comparative literature, with emphasis on its history. S/U or letter grading.

202. Classical Tradition: Epic, Tragedy, or Comedy. (4) Seminar, three hours. Preparation: reading knowledge of Greek, Latin, or Italian. Analysis of Greek and Roman works and their re-creations in Renaissance and modern periods. Emphasis on how poets build on work of their predecessors. Reading may range from Iliador Odyssey to tragedies by Sophocles and Euripides or satires by Aristophanes. S/U or letter grading.

C205. Comic Vision. (4) Lecture, three hours. Preparation: reading knowledge of one appropriate foreign language. Literary masterpieces, both dramatic and nondramatic, selected to demonstrate varieties of comic expression. May be concurrently scheduled with course C105. Graduate students required to prepare papers based on texts read in original languages and to meet as group one additional hour each week. S/U or letter grading.

206. Archetypal Heroes in Literature. (4) Seminar, three hours. Preparation: reading knowledge of one appropriate foreign language. Survey and analysis of function and appearance of such archetypal heroes as Achilles, Ulysses, Prometheus, Oedipus, and Orpheus in literature from antiquity to modern period. S/U or letter grading.

210. Comparative Studies in Autobiography. (5) Seminar, three hours. Limited to graduate students. Introduction to theories of autobiography and subjectivity and to genre of autobiography in literatures in French and English and across centuries. Topics include early modern approaches to self-writing, Rousseau and emergence of modern self, women’s autobiography, postcolonial autobiography, cultural studies and turn to personal, fictions of self-representation, serial autobiography, and virtual selves. Theorists may include Georges Gusdorf, Philippe Lejeune, Paul de Man, Jacques Derrida, Helene Cixous, Michel Foucault, Pierre Bourdieu, and Toril Moi. S/U or letter grading.

220. Topics in Medieval Studies. (4) Seminar, four hours. Preparation: reading knowledge of one appropriate foreign language. Examination of nature of cross-cultural, cross-linguistic, and cross-confessional exchange in known medieval worlds of Europe, Asia, and Africa, with focus on communication and translation. Drawing on literary, social, cultural, economic, art history, and manuscript studies to trace formation of discourses produced by diverse encounters. Choice of bilingual texts. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

C222. Renaissance Drama. (4) Lecture, three hours. Preparation: reading knowledge of one appropriate foreign language. Broad introduction to subject matter and types of plays in Renaissance, with consideration of historical and literary influences on plays. Readings include works of such dramatists as Tasso, Machiavelli, Lope de Vega, Racine, Jonson, Shakespeare. May be concurrently scheduled with course C122. Graduate students required to prepare papers based on texts read in original languages and to meet as group one additional hour each week. S/U or letter grading.

M251. Literatures and Cultures of Maghreb. (4) (Same as Arabic M255.) Seminar, three hours. Limited to graduate students. Examination of traditionally diverse literatures of Maghreb in their multiple and competing contexts of language and gender politics, religious and cultural formations, Pan-Arabism and postcolonial nationhood, Third-Worldism and economic development, modernity and globalization, immigration and citizenship, soccer industry and Rai music, mass media and Star Academy Maghreb, and more. Readings of literatures in English and in English translations from different Maghrebian languages (particularly Arabic and French) in conjunction with theories of language and linguistic pluralism, cultural translation, deconstruction, and host of other relevant theories of gender, globalization, and postcolonial cultural studies. S/U or letter grading.

C252. Symbolism and Decadence. (5) Seminar, four hours. Preparation: reading knowledge of French. Study of symbolist and decadent movements in 19th- and 20th-century English and French poetry and prose, including authors such as Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Verlaine, Mallarmé, Wilde, Yeats, and Eliot. May be concurrently scheduled with course C152. Graduate students required to prepare papers based on texts read in original languages and may meet as group one additional hour each week. S/U or letter grading.

C253. Post-Symbolist Poetry and Poetics. (5) Seminar, four hours. Study of specific poets and poetics related to them during first half of 20th century. Texts may include poets such as W.B. Yeats, Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, Paul Valéry, R.M. Rilke, Gunnar Ekelöf, and Wallace Stevens. May be concurrently scheduled with course C153. Graduate students may meet as group one additional hour each week. S/U or letter grading.

C256. Fantastic Fictions. (4) Seminar, three hours. Time and again in modern literature, corpses become conduits or catalysts for revelation. What are ghosts that fiction frequently cannot put to rest, and what is their connection to national history or nation language or narrative? Readings from James Joyce, John Banville, Henry James, Toni Morrison, Adolfo Bioy Casares, Juan Carlos Onetti, Juan Rulfo, and Carlos Fuentes, with films by Alejandro Amenabar, Andrei Tarkovsky, and Kenji Mizoguchi. May be concurrently scheduled with course C156. Graduate students have additional meetings and theoretical readings by Benjamin, Freud, Barthes, Derrida, Rabate, Rickels, and Caruth. S/U or letter grading.

C260. Literature and Visual Arts. (4) Lecture, three hours. Knowledge of art history valuable but not required. Assuming that literature and visual arts are in some degree expressions of cultural and philosophical patterns of eras, study of relationships between writers and movements in painting, architecture, and sculpture. Interdisciplinary investigation of similarities and differences between plastic and verbal arts in comparative study. May be repeated for credit with instructor and/or topic change. May be concurrently scheduled with course C160. Graduate students required to read works in original languages. S/U or letter grading.

C261. Fiction and History. (4) Seminar, three hours. Analysis of use of historical events, situations, and characters in literary works of Renaissance and/or modern period. Texts and individual assignments range from Renaissance historical narratives (Italian humanists, Machiavelli) to 19th- and 20th-century novels by authors such as Stendhal, Verga, Tomasi di Lampedusa, Carpentier, and Kundera. Use of fictional methods by historians. Emphasis on how aesthetic, ideological, and political factors influence authors’ choice and use of historical material. May be concurrently scheduled with course C161. Graduate students required to prepare papers based on texts read in original languages. S/U or letter grading.

C263. Crisis of Consciousness in Modern Literature. (5) Seminar, three hours. Preparation: reading knowledge of one appropriate foreign language. Study of modern European and American works that are concerned both in subject matter and artistic methods with growing self-consciousness of human beings and their society, with focus on works of Kafka, Rilke, Woolf, Sartre, and Stevens. May be concurrently scheduled with course C163. Graduate students required to prepare papers based on texts read in original languages and to meet as group one additional hour each week. S/U or letter grading.

C264. Modern European Novel. (5) Seminar, three hours. Preparation: reading knowledge of at least one appropriate foreign language. Study of modern European novel’s development from 19th to 21st century. Use of authors such as Hardy, Strindberg, Lagerkvist, Gide, Proust, Mann, Joyce, Kafka, Woolf, Nabokov, Grass, Christa Wolf, and Enquist to focus on development of themes such as shifting authority, gender conflicts, change versus stability, formal experimentation, and self-consciousness in narrative. May be concurrently scheduled with course C164. Graduate students required to prepare papers based on texts read in original languages whenever possible and to meet one additional hour each week. S/U or letter grading.

266. Writing and Photographic Image. (4) Seminar, three hours. Preparation: knowledge of one appropriate foreign language. Designed for graduate students. Investigation of intertextual relations between writing and photography in American and European contexts. Study rests on premise that photograph enters public domain framed by writing and discourse and that, in turn, some forms of writing are framed by photographic modes of representation. S/U or letter grading.

267. Comparative Arab Studies. (5) Seminar, three hours. Limited to graduate students. Investigation of ways in which Arab littérateurs, artists, and intellectuals have perseveringly sought to imagine and construct viable structures of cultural empowerment on pyre of political project of Arab nationalism and in growing response to globalization and consolidation of Western colonial and imperial ideologies in Arab world. Particular attention to technical and experimental modes of expression through which Arab artists working in different genres have engaged with some persistent and recurrent questions related to their mission, vocation, and commitment (iltizam) to fundamental concerns of Arab world, to responsible mimetic urgency, and to general uses/potencies of rhetoric and poetics within contexts of profound asymmetries of power, temporalities, and actualities. S/U or letter grading.

CM270. Alternate Traditions: In Search of Female Voices in Contemporary Literature. (5) (Same as Gender Studies CM270.) Seminar, four hours. Designed for graduate students. Investigation of narrative texts by contemporary French, German, English, American, Spanish American, African, and Asian women writers from cross-cultural perspective. Common themes, problems, and techniques. Concurrently scheduled with course CM170. S/U or letter grading.

271. Imaginary Women. (4) Seminar, three hours. Preparation: reading knowledge of one appropriate foreign language. Examination of archetypal female figures in classical/traditional literatures and their reincarnations in modern African American, Anglo-American, Asian American, European, Native American, and Spanish-American literatures. Particular emphasis on position of women in cultures and ideology of authors. S/U or letter grading.

C272. Postmodern Novel. (4) Seminar, three hours. Preparation: reading knowledge of one appropriate foreign language. Study of postmodern novel as it developed out of modernism. Postmodernism defined in three different ways—philosophically, scientifically, and economically. Emphasis on relationship of recent novels to theories of structuralism and poststructuralism. Readings include authors such as Borges, Beckett, Nabokov, Pynchon, Fuentes, Grass, Böll, and Calvino. Concurrently scheduled with course C172. Graduate students required to meet as group one additional hour each week. S/U or letter grading.

M274. Theorizing Third World. (4) (Same as Asian American Studies M261.) Seminar, three hours. Investigation of politics of power, gender, and race in complex relationships between so-called First World and Third World, using both theoretical and textual approaches. S/U or letter grading.

275. Nationalism and Immigration Today. (4) Seminar, three hours. Preparation: knowledge of one appropriate foreign language. Designed for graduate students. Literary and social discourses on issues of nationalism, immigration, and politics of identity in our postcolonial era, with consideration of broad range of texts (aesthetic representations, theoretical reflections, and legal documents). S/U or letter grading.

M276. Reading Modern Bodies. (4) (Same as Japanese M276.) Seminar, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Exploration of construction of human body through various modern technologies and discourses, including those of disease, diet, race, gender, and sexuality. Examination of texts from variety of locales, with particular emphasis on Japan. S/U or letter grading.

277. Caribbean Literature from Negritude to Diaspora. (4) Seminar, three hours. Historical approach to modern Anglophone and Francophone Caribbean literature, retracing search for cultural identity, beginning with negritude movement’s claim to Africa as expressed in Aime Cesaire’s classic poem Cahier d’un retour au pays natal and ending with consideration of dispersion of identities in work of writers and intellectuals who contend with problem of diasporic Caribbean culture. S/U or letter grading.

C278. India Ink: Literature and Culture of Modern South Asia. (5) Seminar, three hours. Survey of significant issues in history of 20th-century Indian literature and culture. Great works of modern Indian culture by such figures as Rabindranath Tagore, Satyajit Ray, Faiz Ahmed Faiz, and U.R. Anantha Murthy, including novels, short stories, poetry, films, music, and works in cultural criticism and historical scholarship. Central and defining issue for 20th-century Indian culture is experience of British colonial rule and massive cultural and material changes that accompanied it. Exploration of manner in which literature and culture have developed in interaction with powerful social forces, such as struggle for national independence from Britain under leaders like Mahatma Gandhi and expansion of Indian diaspora. Concurrently scheduled with course C178. S/U grading.

279. Subaltern Studies: Colonial Histories and Cultural Critique. (5) Seminar, three hours. Examination of certain links between practice of cultural criticism and problems in historiography of colonial and postcolonial societies. Use of key texts by members of Subaltern Studies collective of Indian historians to explore some central issues arising from this relationship. What kind of interdisciplinary space is produced by dialog of history and literary and cultural theory? Attention to literary texts to practice such interdisciplinary criticism. Nature of modernity in colonial setting. What is nature of bourgeoisie in colonial society? What kind of modernization does it seek? What is relationship of modern metropolitan bourgeoisie to indigenous one? S/U or letter grading.

280. Latin American Literature in Comparative Contexts. (4) Seminar, three hours. Preparation: reading knowledge of one foreign language. In-depth study of one topic of Latin American literature in comparative context. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

284. Theories of Translation. (4) Seminar, three hours. Examination of various approaches to concept of translation and to its significance for literary studies. Readings include authors such as Matthew Arnold, Walter Benjamin, George Steiner, and Susan Bassnett. S/U or letter grading.

285. Translation Workshop. (4) Seminar, three hours. Preparation: solid reading knowledge of at least one foreign language. Open to qualified undergraduates with proper language preparation. Introduction to principles of literary translation heuristically, that is, on basis of texts participating students translate, and presentation of student work for discussion. Opportunity for students to determine whether they have desire and talent to pursue literary translation as part of their professional lives. S/U or letter grading.

286. Workshop: Social Sciences Translation. (4) Seminar, three hours; tutorial, one hour. Preparation: solid reading knowledge of at least one foreign language. Designed for graduate social sciences students. Techniques students need to render scholarly texts in their fields from language they use in their research into English and to advance their knowledge of language to stage where they can use it more effectively in all aspects of their research, as well as take advantage of translation techniques they have learned. S/U or letter grading.

C287. Reading across Culture. (5) Seminar, three hours. What is it we do when we try to understand words, habits, gestures, and beliefs not our own? Do we understand something foreign to us by immersing ourselves in it or by standing apart? Does ability to understand something foreign imply taking universal standpoint? Can we make judgments about beliefs other than our own? Questions of cultural interpretation have long history in both Western and non-Western cultures. Discussion of history of questions about cross-cultural interpretation and comparative interpretation of cultures in both comparative literature and cultural anthropology. Reading of some very complex and influential works by such writers as Claude Lévi-Strauss, Amitav Ghosh, James Clifford, Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, and Erich Auerbach. Concurrently scheduled with course C187. S/U or letter grading.

M288. Modern Arab Thought. (4) (Same as Arabic M288.) Seminar, three hours. While much has been written and said about resurgence and spread of political Islam after collapse of ideology of secular nationalism and failure of Arab left to apprehend exigencies of postrevolutionary/postcolonial moment, little has been devoted to less sensational topic of modern Arab thought despite unmistakable proliferation of critical output produced by Arab thinkers and artists in aftermath of 1967. Course addresses and redresses this glaring imbalance by considering new cultural material—literary, critical, philosophical, artistic, and journalistic—produced before and after al-Nahda but mostly before and after 1967 and fosters insightful approaches to unlikely coexistence in Arab contemporaneity of ever-deepening and generalized crisis and of steady and consolidated development (if not effervescence) of cultural and artistic production. S/U or letter grading.

289. Theory of Film and Literature. (5) Seminar, three hours; film screening, two hours. Study of redefinition and aims of theories of film and literature. Approaches vary by instructor (e.g., postcoloniality, psychoanalysis, semiotics, transnationalism, gender theory). S/U or letter grading.

290. Contemporary Theories of Criticism. (4) Seminar, three hours. Requisite: course 200A. Advanced course in theory of literature focusing on structuralist, psychoanalytic, and Marxist approaches. S/U or letter grading.

291. Problems in Theory of Literature. (4) Seminar, three hours. Preparation: reading knowledge of French or German. Requisite: course 290. Study of specific topics in theory of literature for advanced students in criticism and literary theory. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

292. Theories of Empire. (4) Seminar, three hours. History of theorizations of modern imperialism and colonialism since relevant writings of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. Examination of number of landmark theories of empire and consideration of whether or not they may be said to constitute coherent tradition or line of theoretical development. Question of resistance to imperial rule and role it plays in these theoretical accounts. S/U or letter grading.

M294. Seminar: Literary Theory. (5) (Same as English M270.) Seminar, three hours. Advanced interdisciplinary seminar to explore philosophical, historical, and critical foundations of literary theory as well as current issues in literary and cultural studies. S/U or letter grading.

299. Aesthetics and Literature. (4) Seminar, three hours. Preparation: reading knowledge of one appropriate foreign language. Study of literary theory through exploration of approaches to literature by philosophers grounded on analytic tradition. Careful attention to concepts of truth, meaning, expression, representation, metaphor, fiction, and literature. Letter grading.

375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum. (1 to 4) Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

495. Preparation for Teaching Literature and Composition. (4) Seminar, three hours. Seminar on problems and methods of presenting literary texts as exemplary materials in teaching of composition. Deals with theory and classroom practice and involves individual counseling and faculty evaluation of teaching assistants’ performance. May not be applied toward MA course requirements. S/U grading.

501. Cooperative Program. (2 to 8) Tutorial, to be arranged. Preparation: consent of UCLA graduate adviser and graduate dean, and host campus instructor, department chair, and graduate dean. Used to record enrollment of UCLA students in courses taken under cooperative arrangements with USC. S/U grading.

596. Directed Individual Study or Research. (2 to 12) Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate comparative literature students. Necessary for students in comparative literature who need additional individual study and research. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

596X. Directed Individual Study. (2 to 4) Tutorial, to be arranged. Preparation for foreign language examination. S/U grading.

597. Preparation for MA and PhD Examinations. (2 to 12) Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate students. Preparation for MA comprehensive examination or PhD qualifying examinations. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

599. Research for PhD Dissertation. (2 to 12) Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to PhD students. Research for and preparation of PhD dissertation. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

Winter 2017

Comparative Literature 200B: Methodology of Comparative Literature

Instructor: Gil Z. Hochberg

Study of methodology of comparative literature, with emphasis on its history.

Class Title: “Thinking with Theory”

Comparative Literature 290 (Seminar 1): Religion, Philosophy, and Politics

Instructor: Eleanor Kaufman

Exploration of religion in conjunction with key moments and thinkers in history of western philosophy, from classical to modern period. Study generally takes form of textual pairings in which given theme is traced over large historical arc. Themes may include time and eternity, confession, heresy, apostasy, Gnosis, and possibly mysticism. Thinkers considered may include Aristotle, Augustine, Ibn ‘Arabi, Aquinas, Spinoza, Kant, Corbin, Weil, Derrida, Kristeva, and Agamben.

Comparative Literature 290 (Seminar 2): Islam and Modernity: Philosophy, Politics, and Culture

Instructor: Aamir R. Mufti

Students become familiar with contemporary discussions about Islamic thought of modern era. Readings include philosophical and theological literature on modernity in number of Muslim societies–India-Pakistan, Egypt, Iran, and Europe–from late 19th century to present. In aftermath of widely announced exhaustion of secularization thesis in recent years–by such figures as Jürgen Habermas, Charles Taylor, and Talal Asad–what possibilities remain for secular-critical approaches to varieties of religious experience in contemporary world? Study concerned with understanding paths from colonial neo-orthodoxy to forms of Islamic practice and thought in present. Literary works viewed in tension with theological tradition. Elucidation of structure of relations between literary discourse and legal-scriptural in contemporary Muslim societies. Readings by al-Afghani, Qutb, Maududi, M. Asad, T. Asad, al-Azmeh, Rahman, Rushdie, and others.

Comparative Literature 290 (Seminar 3): Introduction to Peter Sloterdijk

Instructor: Efrain Kristal

Exploration of Peter Sloterdijk’s central concerns. These include meditations on cynicism, post-humanism, war, and circulation of peoples, goods, and information around globe; ideas about noxious impact of resentment in human and historical affairs; and views about generosity as human right. Study situates Sloterdijk as thinker who broke away from German critical theory associated with Frankfurt School (Adorno, Horkheimer, and Habermas) in which he was originally steeped, to shift his focus of philosophical attention from political and social critique to exhortation for coexistence and cooperation predicated on original anthropological vision about cultural and technological mechanisms human beings have developed–for better or worse–to protect themselves from dangers and predicaments of life. Exploration of notion of spheres, coined by Sloterdijk, to investigate spaces and environments humans inhabit.

Comparative Literature 290 (Seminar 5): BioCities: Urban Ecology and the Cultural Imagination

Instructor: Ursula Heise, Jon Christensen

This seminar introduces students to the study of nature in the modern city with the help of materials from environmental history, environmental literature, ecocriticism, cultural geography, urban studies (including urban planning), design, and architecture. From the early 20th to the early 21st century, the experience of the metropolis has been one of the most powerful catalysts for distinctively modernist idioms in literature, film, painting, and architecture, and it has also provided one of the matrices for distinctively postmodern literature and design idioms in the period after 1960. In 2008, humanity crossed a historical boundary: more than 50% of the global population now lives in cities, and future population growth will occur or end up in urban areas, with important ecological as well as social, cultural, and aesthetic consequences. Even though urban ecology is only beginning to emerge as a major new research area in the natural sciences and urban planning, the city has had a biological identity since long before modernity, and is beginning to develop an ecological profile again in the contemporary globalized metropolis. The BioCities seminar will explore the realities and cultural imaginations of the city as novel ecosystem over time and around the globe through stories, maps, and images. It will provide students with a global horizon in terms of how the city is imagined and represented in literature, film, and other media over the course of last hundred years, and it will also develop a particular focus on Los Angeles. Readings will include literary works; nonfictional text; planning, architectural, and geographical document; and works across media such as photography, films, maps, websites, and databases.