Undergraduate Courses

A modern play upon Dante, “Devil May Cry” (2015). Faculty Dante expert: Massimo Ciavolella.

  • For information about specific section times and locations please view the UCLA Schedule of Classes.
  • For a complete listing of department courses visit the UCLA General Catalog.

Courses (Winter 2018)

Comparative Literature 2BW: Survey of Literature: Middle Ages to 17th Century

Instructor: David MacFadyen

Study of selected texts from Middle Ages to 17th century, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts may include works by authors such as Chaucer, Dante, Cervantes, Marguerite de Navarre, Shakespeare, Calderón, Molière, and Racine. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

Comparative Literature 2DW: Survey of Literature: Great Books from World at Large

Instructor: Ali Behdad

Study of major literary texts usually overlooked in courses that focus only on canon of Western literature, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts from at least three of following areas read in any given term: African, Caribbean, East Asian, Latin American, and Middle Eastern literature. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

Comparative Literature 4DW: Literature and Writing: Great Books from World at Large

Instructor: David MacFadyen

Study and discussion of major literary texts usually overlooked in courses that focus only on canon of Western literature, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts from at least three of following areas read in any given term: African, Caribbean, East Asian, Latin American, and Middle Eastern literature. Texts may include works by authors such as Ngugi, Desai, Kincaid, Emecheta, El Saadawi, Achebe, Pak, Can Xue, Neruda, and Rushdie. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

Comparative Literature 100: Introduction to Literary and Critical Theory

Instructor: Stephanie Bosch Santana

Seminar-style introduction to discipline of comparative literature presented through series of texts illustrative of its formation and practice.

Comparative Literature M101: Hebrew Literature in English: Literary Traditions of Ancient Israel — Bible and Apocrypha

Instructor: Jeremy D. Smoak

(Same as Jewish Studies M150A.) Study of literary culture of ancient Israel through examination of principal compositional strategies of Hebrew Bible and Apocrypha (read in translation).

M119. Al-Andalus: Literature of Islamic Spain

Instructor: Susan Slyomovics

Study of literature of Islamic Spain to learn about interaction of Arabic and Western and Arabic and Jewish cultures and to recognize Islamic culture as vital force in European life and letters.

Comparative Literature M166: Modern Jewish Literature in English: Diaspora Literature

Instructor: Saba Soomekh

(Same as Jewish Studies M151A.) Study of literary responses of Jews to modernity, its challenges, and threats. Readings in texts originally written in English or translated from Hebrew, Yiddish, German, Russian, French, and Italian. Analysis of formal aspects of each work.

Comparative Literature CM170: Alternate Traditions: In Search of Female Voices in Contemporary Literature

Instructor: Katherine King

(Same as Gender Studies CM170.) Designed for upper division literature majors. Investigation of narrative texts by contemporary French, German, English, American, Spanish American, African, and Asian women writers from cross-cultural perspective. Common themes, problems, and techniques.

Comparative Literature 180: Variable Topics: Medical Humanities in Comparative Contexts: Literary and Medical Conceptions of Body, Mind, and Soul in Classical and Early-Modern Literature and Science

Instructor: Massimo Ciavolella

Focus on how understanding of human beings’ nature (in terms of physiological and emotional responses) changes from ancient world to dawn of modernity in 15th and 16th centuries. Examination of medical, philosophical, and literary texts from ancient Greece and Rome to trace premodern conception of bodily and emotional diseases. Discussion of ancient humoral theory, believed to be at center of human organism’s physiological and emotional functioning; love; melancholy; and relationship between body and mind. With birth of nations–France, Spain, England, and city-states in Italy–changes in western society radically changed geographical and human landscape of Europe. With incremental population growth of many cities, new problems connected with well-being of citizenry arose: first health, then education.

Comparative Literature 191 (Seminar 1): Variable Topics in Comparative Literature: Return of Fascism in Euro-American World

Instructor: Aamir R. Mufti

Fascism has returned to political vocabulary of today suddenly and without much intellectual preparation. As events hurtle us forward–or is it backward–toward some as-yet indiscernible catastrophe, we seem to have grasped spontaneously at this relic in hope it might deliver understanding of present and how we got here. Study tries to put on firmer conceptual and historical footing possibility of understanding present political and social crisis as return of fascism as political culture across Euro-American world. Contemporary U.S. is at core, but study also places U.S. in a wider comparative frame, examining contemporary and historical developments in Europe as well. Students read works of literature, theory and philosophy, literary and linguistic analysis, and sociology by such figures as Theodor Adorno, Hannah Arendt, Margaret Atwood, Georges Bataille, Bertolt Brecht, Alexander Dugin, Julius Evola, Filippo Marinetti, and Ezra Pound, among others.