Undergraduate Courses

A modern play upon Dante, “Devil May Cry” (2015). Faculty Dante expert: Massimo Ciavolella.

  • For information about specific section times and locations please view the UCLA Schedule of Classes.
  • For a complete listing of department courses visit the UCLA General Catalog.

Courses (Spring 2018)

Comparative Literature 169: Continental African Authors

Instructor: Stephanie Bosch Santana

Introduction to new set of African authors and attempt to discern similarities or differences they may have with major authors such as Achebe, Ngugi, Armath, Soyinka, etc.

Comparative Literature C152: Symbolism and Decadence

Instructor: Ross Shideler

Study of symbolist and decadent movements in 19th- and 20th-century English and French poetry and prose, including authors such as Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Verlaine, Mallarmé, Wilde, Yeats, and Eliot. May be concurrently scheduled with course C252. Undergraduate students may read all required French texts in translation.

Comparative Literature C163: Crisis of Consciousness in Modern Literature

Instructor: Kathleen L. Komar

Study of modern European and American works that are concerned both in subject matter and artistic methods with growing self-consciousness of human beings and their society, with focus on works of Kafka, Rilke, Woolf, Sartre, and Stevens. May be concurrently scheduled with course C263. Undergraduate students may read all works in translation.

Comparative Literature C187: Reading across Culture

Instructor: Anjali Arondekar

What is it we do when we try to understand words, habits, gestures, and beliefs not our own? Do we understand something foreign to us by immersing ourselves in it or by standing apart? Does ability to understand something foreign imply taking universal standpoint? Can we make judgments about beliefs other than our own? Questions of cultural interpretation have long history in both Western and non-Western cultures. Discussion of history of questions about cross-cultural interpretation and comparative interpretation of cultures in both comparative literature and cultural anthropology. Reading of some very complex and influential works by such writers as Claude Lévi-Strauss, Amitav Ghosh, James Clifford, Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, and Erich Auerbach. Concurrently scheduled with course C287.

Comparative Literature 2CW: Survey of Literature: Age of Enlightenment to 20th Century

Instructor: Anjali Arondekar

Study of selected texts from Age of Enlightenment to 20th century, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts may include works by authors such as Swift, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Goethe, Flaubert, Ibsen, Strindberg, M. Shelley, Dostoevsky, Kafka, James Joyce, Garcia Marquez, and Jamaica Kincaid. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

Comparative Literature 2DW: Survey of Literature: Great Books from World at Large

Instructor: Aamir R. Mufti

Study of major literary texts usually overlooked in courses that focus only on canon of Western literature, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts from at least three of following areas read in any given term: African, Caribbean, East Asian, Latin American, and Middle Eastern literature. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

Comparative Literature 4DW: Literature and Writing: Great Books from World at Large

Instructor: David MacFadyen

Study and discussion of major literary texts usually overlooked in courses that focus only on canon of Western literature, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts from at least three of following areas read in any given term: African, Caribbean, East Asian, Latin American, and Middle Eastern literature. Texts may include works by authors such as Ngugi, Desai, Kincaid, Emecheta, El Saadawi, Achebe, Pak, Can Xue, Neruda, and Rushdie. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

Comparative Literature 19 (Fiat Lux Seminar): Poets and Desire

Instructor: Ross Shideler

Representations of desire take many forms: sometimes poetic or imaginary, sometimes erotic and sensual. Students look at poets through centuries who have written from different perspectives about their desires and/or their frustrations.

Comparative Literature 100: Introduction to Literary and Critical Theory

Instructor: Shu-mei Shih

Seminar-style introduction to discipline of comparative literature presented through series of texts illustrative of its formation and practice.

Comparative Literature M167: Modern Arabic Literature in English

Instructor: Nouri Gana Livescu, S.L.

(Same as Arabic M151.) Designed for upper division literature majors. Topics may include constructions of otherness in modern Arab culture; East-West debate; memory, trauma, and mourning; violence, narrative, and ethics; globalization, oil, and cultural insurgency; Arab culture in transnational context or questions of reception, exoticism, translation, and marketing. Genres may include prison narratives; novel of terror; memoirs by women and/or by refugees and exiles; 19th- and 20th-century travel narratives; Arabic romantic poetry; literature of pre-1948; rise of Arab novel. Areas may range from generic look at Arab world to narrow focus on Maghreb or one country such as Algeria, Palestine, Iraq, Lebanon, or Egypt. May also be organized around Arab literature written in one specific language, namely English, Arabic, or French.

Comparative Literature 180: Variable Topics: Medical Humanities in Comparative Contexts: Foundations of Western Medicine, from Hippocrates to Vesalius

Instructor: Massimo Ciavolella Touwaide, A.

The Greek physician Hippocrates is traditionally identified as father of medicine. This affirmation drastically abbreviates medicine’s long history, from Antiquity to dawn of modern science. From Hippocrates to recovery and renewed analysis of ancient medicine in Renaissance best heralded by Vesalius, study presents development and transmission of knowledge in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, and Byzantium; through Middle Ages, Arabic world, and Renaissance. Focus on achievements, theories, and beliefs of great figures while examining their environmental, societal, religious, cultural, economic, and technical contexts. Survey of knowledge of human body–its functions and dysfunctions, and methods for its study; ways of preserving health, preventing disease, and treating illness; and many parameters that favored or limited investigation.

Comparative Literature 180SL: Medical Humanities in Comparative Contexts and Community-Based Learning

Instructor: Hans Barnard

Exploration of relation between humans and world. This is often seen as function of brain, problematic hypothesis as brain is as ineffective without body as body is without its brain. Output of brain, irrespective of what may go on inside it, is control over movements. Central facility, identified as consciousness, integrates input and decides on course of action. Ownership and agency also result from systems that control movements. It is thus not “I think, therefore I am,” but “I move, therefore I am.” This rephrasing of Cartesian paradigm is central to study. Service learning integrates instruction with community service and students are required to devote at least 20 hours to off-campus service. To facilitate and follow discussions in class, students read one scientific article each week and watch one movie, and read three of seven novels. Students also conduct individual research project.

Comparative Literature 191: Variable Topics in Comparative Literature

Instructor: Tamara Levitz

Study and discussion of limited periods and specialized issues and approaches in literary theory, especially in relation to other modes of discourse such as history, philosophy, psychology, linguistics, anthropology. Development of culminating project required. Consult “Schedule of Classes” for topics to be offered in specific term.