Undergraduate Courses

A modern play upon Dante, “Devil May Cry” (2015). Faculty Dante expert: Massimo Ciavolella.

  • For information about specific section times and locations  please view the UCLA Schedule of Classes.
  • For a complete listing of department courses visit the UCLA General Catalog. The listings below were accessed in September 2017.

 

Lower-Division Courses

1A. World Literature: Antiquity to Middle Ages. (5) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 2AW or 4AW. Study of major texts in world literature, with emphasis on Western civilization. Texts include major works and authors such as Iliad or Odyssey, Greek tragedies, portions of Bible, Virgil, Petronius, St. Augustine, and others such as Gilgamesh or Tristan and Iseult. P/NP or letter grading.

1B. World Literature: Middle Ages to 17th Century. (5) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 2BW or 4BW. Study of world literature, with emphasis on Western civilization as it grapples with its past and with other civilizations. Examination of works such as Dante’s Divine Comedy, Cervantes’ Don Quixote, Shakespeare’s King Lear, and Sor Juana’s Mexican poetry. P/NP or letter grading.

1C. World Literature: Age of Enlightenment to 20th Century. (5) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 2CW or 4CW. Study of major texts in world literature, with emphasis on Western civilization. Authors include Swift, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Goethe, Flaubert, Ibsen, Strindberg, Dostoevsky, Kafka, Joyce, Woolf, and Stevens. P/NP or letter grading.

1D. Great Books from World at Large. (5) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 2DW or 4DW. Study of major literary texts usually overlooked in courses that focus only on canon of Western literature. Texts from at least three of following areas read in any given term: African, Caribbean, East Asian, Latin American, and Middle Eastern literature. P/NP or letter grading.

1E. Social Media and Storytelling: Comparing Cultures. (5) Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Study of social media as platform for storytelling, with core focus on three distinct cultures: U.S., China, and Russia. History, form, and various functions of social media. Examination of how we tell stories about ourselves and how we interpret digital narratives we see, hear, or read from organizations near and far. Analysis of networked narratives encountered online. P/NP or letter grading.

2AW. Survey of Literature: Antiquity to Middle Ages. (5) Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1A or 4AW. Study of selected texts from antiquity to Middle Ages, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts include works and authors such as Odyssey, Gilgamesh,Sappho, Greek tragedies, Aeneid, Petronius, Beowulf, Marie de France, Tristan and Iseult, 1001 Nights, Popul Vuh. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

2BW. Survey of Literature: Middle Ages to 17th Century. (5) Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1B or 4BW. Study of selected texts from Middle Ages to 17th century, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts may include works by authors such as Chaucer, Dante, Cervantes, Marguerite de Navarre, Shakespeare, Calderón, Molière, and Racine. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

2CW. Survey of Literature: Age of Enlightenment to 20th Century. (5) Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1C or 4CW. Study of selected texts from Age of Enlightenment to 20th century, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts may include works by authors such as Swift, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Goethe, Flaubert, Ibsen, Strindberg, M. Shelley, Dostoevsky, Kafka, James Joyce, Garcia Marquez, and Jamaica Kincaid. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

2DW. Survey of Literature: Great Books from World at Large. (5) Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1D or 4DW. Study of major literary texts usually overlooked in courses that focus only on canon of Western literature, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts from at least three of following areas read in any given term: African, Caribbean, East Asian, Latin American, and Middle Eastern literature. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

4AW. Literature and Writing: Antiquity to Middle Ages. (5) Discussion, four hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1A or 2AW. Study and discussion of selected texts from antiquity to Middle Ages, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts include works and authors such as Iliad, Odyssey, Gilgamesh,Sappho, Greek tragedies, Aeneid, Petronius, Beowulf, or Marie de France. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

4BW. Literature and Writing: Middle Ages to 17th Century. (5) Discussion, four hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1B or 2BW. Study and discussion of selected texts from Middle Ages to 17th century, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts may include works and authors such as Chaucer, Dante’s Divine Comedy, Cervantes’ Don Quixote, Shakespeare, 1001 Nights, Christine de Pizan, Popul Vuh,Molière, and Racine. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

4CW. Literature and Writing: Age of Enlightenment to 20th Century. (5) Discussion, four hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1C or 2CW. Study and discussion of selected texts from Age of Enlightenment to 20th century, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts may include works by authors such as Swift, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Goethe, M. Shelley, Flaubert, Ibsen, Strindberg, Dostoevsky, Gogol, Kafka, Joyce, Beckett, L. Hughes, and Garcia Marquez. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

4DW. Literature and Writing: Great Books from World at Large. (5) Discussion, four hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1D or 2DW. Study and discussion of major literary texts usually overlooked in courses that focus only on canon of Western literature, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts from at least three of following areas read in any given term: African, Caribbean, East Asian, Latin American, and Middle Eastern literature. Texts may include works by authors such as Ngugi, Desai, Kincaid, Emecheta, El Saadawi, Achebe, Pak, Can Xue, Neruda, and Rushdie. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

 

 

Upper-Division Courses

100. Introduction to Literary and Critical Theory. (5) Lecture, four hours. Preparation: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing and College Writing requirements. Requisites: two courses from Comparative Literature 1 or 2 series or English 10 series or Spanish 60 series, etc. Seminar-style introduction to discipline of comparative literature presented through series of texts illustrative of its formation and practice. Letter grading.

M101. Hebrew Literature in English—Literary Traditions of Ancient Israel: Bible and Apocrypha. (4) (Same as Jewish Studies M150A.) Lecture, three hours. Study of literary culture of ancient Israel through examination of principal compositional strategies of Hebrew Bible and Apocrypha (read in translation). P/NP or letter grading.

102. Classical Tradition: Epic. (4) Seminar, three hours. Designed for upper-division literature majors. Analysis of Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid, Gerusalemme Liberata, and Paradise Lost both in relation to their contemporary societies and to literary traditions. Emphasis on how poets build on work of their predecessors. P/NP or letter grading.

103. People on Run: Migrants, Minorities, and Multiculturalism in Europe. (4) Seminar, three hours. Problem of migrants and refugees in ongoing crisis of European Union. Examination of contemporary crisis of European Union and of European multiculturalism in particular. Overview of history of European integration since World War II, as well as more focused examination of ways in which culture and migration have come to dominate discussions of future of what had primarily been conceived of as one economic union. Offered in summer only. P/NP or letter grading.

C105. Comic Vision. (4) Lecture, three hours. Designed for upper-division literature majors. Literary masterpieces, both dramatic and nondramatic, selected to demonstrate varieties of comic expression. May be concurrently scheduled with course C205. Undergraduate students read all works in translation. P/NP or letter grading.

106. Archetypal Heroes in Literature. (4) Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey and analysis of function and appearance of such archetypal heroes as Achilles, Ulysses, Prometheus, Oedipus, and Orpheus in literature from antiquity to modern period. All works read in translation. P/NP or letter grading.

108. Autobiography in Francophone and Anglophone Worlds. (5) Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Focus on number of narratives that use autobiographical mode to situate self in relation to history of nations and biography of family members. Introduction to theories of subjectivity and to genre of self-writing in France, Africa, and Caribbean. Comparison of serial autobiographies of Assia Djebar, Annie Ernaux, and Jamaica Kincaid to better understand limits of genre. Texts represent different limit cases of autobiography and can be read as biography, auto/ethnography, and auto/historiography. Examination of differences that emerge between autobiographical pact (Lejeune) that some authors create with their readers and liberties that others take with history. Attention to way visual culture (painting, photography, film) helps authors make their point, access memory, or create metaphors of self. P/NP or letter grading.

M110. Thousand and One Nights /Alf Layla Wa-Layla. (4) (Same as Arabic M110.) Lecture, three hours. Knowledge of Arabic not required. Since its appearance in Europe in 1704, Thousand and One Nights is most well-known work of Arabic literature in West. Examination of cycle of tales more commonly known as Arabian Nights, including history of its translation, contemporary oral performances of tales in Arabic-speaking world, literary emergence of vernacular language in relation to classical Arabic, and Western appropriations of tales in music, film, and novels (Ravel, Rimsky-Korsakov, Barth, Poe, and Walt Disney). P/NP or letter grading.

111. Histories and Methodologies of Comparative Literature. (5) Seminar, three hours. Preparation: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing and College writing requirements. Requisites: two courses from Comparative Literature 1 or 2 series or English 10 series or Spanish 60 series. Recommended: course 100. Exploration of history of comparative literature discipline and variety of central methodological past and present debates concerning nature of discipline. Introduction to several key theoretical texts from early 20th century to present, addressing these and other related questions: what does it mean to read comparatively? What is significance of reading literature across existing national and linguistic borders? What are criteria for conducting such comparative readings? Is comparative reading more concerned with finding similarities or differences? P/NP or letter grading.

M119. Al-Andalus: Literature of Islamic Spain. (4) (Same as Arabic M155.) Lecture, three hours. Study of literature of Islamic Spain to learn about interaction of Arabic and Western and Arabic and Jewish cultures and to recognize Islamic culture as vital force in European life and letters. P/NP or letter grading.

C122. Renaissance Drama. (4) Lecture, three hours. Designed for upper-division literature majors. Broad introduction to subject matter and types of plays in Renaissance, with consideration of historical and literary influences on plays. Readings include works of such dramatists as Tasso, Machiavelli, Lope de Vega, Racine, Jonson, Shakespeare. May be concurrently scheduled with course C222. Undergraduate students read all works in translation. P/NP or letter grading.

M123. Oral Literature and Performance of Arab World. (4) (Same as Arabic M123.) Lecture, three hours. Knowledge of Arabic not required. Introduction to study of living oral traditions of troubadours, storytellers, oral poets, and performers in Arabic-speaking Middle East. P/NP or letter grading.

M132. Comparative Media Studies. (4) (Same as Russian M132.) Lecture, three hours. History, form, and function of various media. Grounded in political and commercial experience of Eastern Europe, comparative investigation of media technologies, today’s burgeoning markets, and yesterday’s tragic abuses. Development of media form(s) and content across various times, places, and cultures, with special attention to Slavic phenomena. Letter grading.

M148. Contemporary Arab Film and Song. (4) (Same as Arabic M148.) Seminar, three hours. Exploration of conjunctions between contemporary Arab film and song and between popular cultures and cultures of commitment (Iltizam), with possible focus on specific genres such as realist/neorealist Arab film; feminist Arab film or popular Arab film and song; topics such as nation, gender, and representation or democracy and human rights or censorship, reception, and resistance. Possible examination of various national cinemas such as Tunisian, Egyptian, Moroccan, Algerian, and Palestinian. Various musical genres such as Rai, Mizoued, and Hip-hop also examined in relation to emergence not only of national cinemas, national music industries, and iconic singers but also of video clip, satellite TV, star academy, and reality shows—all products of transnational and pan-Arab mass media. P/NP or letter grading.

C152. Symbolism and Decadence. (5) Seminar, four hours. Designed for upper-division literature majors. Study of symbolist and decadent movements in 19th- and 20th-century English and French poetry and prose, including authors such as Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Verlaine, Mallarmé, Wilde, Yeats, and Eliot. May be concurrently scheduled with course C252. Undergraduate students may read all required French texts in translation. P/NP or letter grading.

C153. Post-Symbolist Poetry and Poetics. (5) Seminar, four hours. Designed for upper-division literature majors. Study of specific poets and poetics related to them during first half of 20th century. Texts may include poets such as W.B. Yeats, Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, Paul Valéry, R.M. Rilke, Gunnar Ekelöf, and Wallace Stevens. May be concurrently scheduled with course C253. Undergraduate students may read all works in translation. P/NP or letter grading.

154. Adventures of Avant-Garde. (5) Seminar, four hours. Designed for upper-division literature majors. Interdisciplinary study of avant-garde literature and art, including futurism, Dadaism, expressionism, surrealism, new avant-gardes. Works by Marinetti, Boccioni, Picasso, Stein, Malevich, Popova, Mayakovsky, Brecht, Fritz Lang, Duchamp, Breton, Bunuel, Lispector, Warhol, Orlan. Emphasis on cross-fertilization among different kinds of aesthetic expression. P/NP or letter grading.

C156. Fantastic Fictions. (4) Seminar, three hours. Designed for upper-division literature majors. Time and again in modern literature, corpses become conduits or catalysts for revelation. What are ghosts that fiction frequently cannot put to rest, and what is their connection to national history or nation language or narrative? Readings from James Joyce, John Banville, Henry James, Toni Morrison, Adolfo Bioy Casares, Juan Carlos Onetti, Juan Rulfo, and Carlos Fuentes, with films by Alejandro Amenabar, Andrei Tarkovsky, and Kenji Mizoguchi. May be concurrently scheduled with course C256. Undergraduate students read all works in translation. P/NP or letter grading.

C160. Literature and Visual Arts. (4) Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Knowledge of art history valuable but not required. Assuming that literature and visual arts are in some degree expressions of cultural and philosophical patterns of eras, study of relationships between writers and movements in painting, architecture, and sculpture. Interdisciplinary investigation of similarities and differences between plastic and verbal arts in comparative study. May be repeated for credit with instructor and/or topic change. May be concurrently scheduled with course C260. Undergraduate students read all works in translation. P/NP or letter grading.

C161. Fiction and History. (4) Seminar, three hours. Designed for upper-division literature majors. Analysis of use of historical events, situations, and characters in literary works of Renaissance and/or modern period. Texts and individual assignments range from Renaissance historical narratives (Italian humanists, Machiavelli) to 19th- and 20th-century novels by authors such as Stendhal, Verga, Tomasi di Lampedusa, Carpentier, and Kundera. Use of fictional methods by historians. Emphasis on how aesthetic, ideological, and political factors influence authors’ choice and use of historical material. May be concurrently scheduled with course C261. P/NP or letter grading.

M162. Israel Seen through Its Literature. (4) (Same as Jewish Studies M162.) Lecture, three hours. Attempt to impart profound understanding of Israel as seen through its literature. Examination of variety of literary texts—stories, novels, and poems—and reading of them in context of their historical backgrounds. P/NP or letter grading.

C163. Crisis of Consciousness in Modern Literature. (5) Seminar, three hours. Designed for upper-division literature majors. Study of modern European and American works that are concerned both in subject matter and artistic methods with growing self-consciousness of human beings and their society, with focus on works of Kafka, Rilke, Woolf, Sartre, and Stevens. May be concurrently scheduled with course C263. Undergraduate students may read all works in translation. P/NP or letter grading.

C164. Modern European Novel. (5) Seminar, three hours. Designed for upper-division literature majors. Study of modern European novel’s development from 19th to 21st century. Use of authors such as Hardy, Strindberg, Lagerkvist, Gide, Proust, Mann, Joyce, Kafka, Woolf, Nabokov, Grass, Christa Wolf, and Enquist to focus on development of themes such as shifting authority, gender conflicts, change versus stability, formal experimentation, and self-consciousness in narrative. May be concurrently scheduled with course C264. Undergraduate students may read all works in translation but are encouraged to read in original language whenever possible. P/NP or letter grading.

M165. Holocaust in Literature. (4) (Same as Jewish Studies M187.) Lecture, three hours. Investigation of how Holocaust informs variety of literary and cinema works and raises wide range of aesthetic and moral questions. P/NP or letter grading.

M166. Modern Jewish Literature in English: Diaspora Literature. (4) (Same as Jewish Studies M151A.) Lecture, three hours. Study of literary responses of Jews to modernity, its challenges, and threats. Readings in texts originally written in English or translated from Hebrew, Yiddish, German, Russian, French, and Italian. Analysis of formal aspects of each work. P/NP or letter grading.

M167. Modern Arabic Literature in English. (4) (Same as Arabic M151.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for upper-division literature majors. Topics may include constructions of otherness in modern Arab culture; East-West debate; memory, trauma, and mourning; violence, narrative, and ethics; globalization, oil, and cultural insurgency; Arab culture in transnational context or questions of reception, exoticism, translation, and marketing. Genres may include prison narratives; novel of terror; memoirs by women and/or by refugees and exiles; 19th- and 20th-century travel narratives; Arabic romantic poetry; literature of pre-1948; rise of Arab novel. Areas may range from generic look at Arab world to narrow focus on Maghreb or one country such as Algeria, Palestine, Iraq, Lebanon, or Egypt. May also be organized around Arab literatures written in one specific language, namely English, Arabic, or French. Letter grading.

169. Continental African Authors. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: one course from 1A, 1B, 1C, 2AW, 2BW, 2CW, or English Composition 3 or 3H. Introduction to new set of African authors and attempt to discern similarities or differences they may have with major authors such as Achebe, Ngugi, Armath, Soyinka, etc. P/NP or letter grading.

CM170. Alternate Traditions: In Search of Female Voices in Contemporary Literature. (5) (Same as Gender Studies CM170.) Seminar, three hours. Designed for upper-division literature majors. Investigation of narrative texts by contemporary French, German, English, American, Spanish American, African, and Asian women writers from cross-cultural perspective. Common themes, problems, and techniques. Concurrently scheduled with course CM270. P/NP or letter grading.

M171. Chinese Immigrant Literature and Film. (4) (Same as Asian American Studies M130B and Chinese M153.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Chinese not required. In-depth look at Chinese immigrant experience by reading literature and watching films. Theories of diaspora, gender, and race to inform thinking and discussion of relevant issues. P/NP or letter grading.

C172. Postmodern Novel. (4) Seminar, three hours. Designed for upper-division literature majors. Study of postmodern novel as it developed out of modernism. Postmodernism defined in three different ways—philosophically, scientifically, and economically. Emphasis on relationship of recent novels to theories of structuralism and poststructuralism. Readings include authors such as Borges, Beckett, Nabokov, Pynchon, Fuentes, Grass, Böll, and Calvino. Concurrently scheduled with course C272. Undergraduate students read all works in translation. P/NP or letter grading.

M175. Race, Gender, Class. (5) (Same as Asian American Studies M165.) Seminar, three hours. Theoretical and literary readings combined to explore three main aspects of social and cultural experience (race, gender, class) as separate but interconnected spheres affecting both minority and majority populations in U.S. Examination of these issues from comparative perspectives. P/NP or letter grading.

M176. Literature and Technology. (4) (Same as Japanese M156.) Lecture, three hours. Knowledge of Japanese not required. Examination of representation of technology in 20th-century fiction. Discussion of impact of technology on shifting images of gender, subjectivity, and national identity. P/NP or letter grading.

177. Comparative Literature of Francophone and Anglophone Caribbean. (5) Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Introduction to literature and culture of Caribbean basin from New Orleans to Haiti, Martinique, Guadeloupe, Jamaica, Antigua, or Trinidad. Topics include history of French and English colonial influences and rivalries, Haitian revolution and its literary legacies, emergence of nationalist discourses, search for cultural identity, rhetoric of negritude, global poetics of relation, créolité movement. and literary achievements of African diaspora. P/NP or letter grading.

C178. India Ink: Literature and Culture of Modern South Asia. (5) Seminar, three hours. Survey of significant issues in history of 20th-century Indian literature and culture. Great works of modern Indian culture by such figures as Rabindranath Tagore, Satyajit Ray, Faiz Ahmed Faiz, and U.R. Anantha Murthy, including novels, short stories, poetry, films, music, and works in cultural criticism and historical scholarship. Central and defining issue for 20th-century Indian culture is experience of British colonial rule and massive cultural and material changes that accompanied it. Exploration of manner in which literature and culture have developed in interaction with powerful social forces, such as struggle for national independence from Britain under leaders like Mahatma Gandhi and expansion of Indian diaspora. Concurrently scheduled with course C278. P/NP or letter grading.

180. Variable Topics: Medical Humanities in Comparative Contexts. (4) Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study and discussion of defined periods and approaches in medical humanities, giving pride of place to literary and cultural expressions in dialogue with other disciplines such as anthropology, history, linguistics, philosophy, psychology, or sociology. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics to be offered in specific term. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

180SL. Variable Topics: Medical Humanities in Comparative Contexts and Community-Based Learning. (4)Seminar, three hours; fieldwork, three hours. Exploration of topics in medical humanities with community service component, giving pride of place to literary and cultural expressions with other disciplines such as art, philosophy, or sociology. Ways in which medical humanities can make contributions to Los Angeles community through service learning. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics to be offered in specific term. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

C187. Reading across Culture. (5) Seminar, three hours. What is it we do when we try to understand words, habits, gestures, and beliefs not our own? Do we understand something foreign to us by immersing ourselves in it or by standing apart? Does ability to understand something foreign imply taking universal standpoint? Can we make judgments about beliefs other than our own? Questions of cultural interpretation have long history in both Western and non-Western cultures. Discussion of history of questions about cross-cultural interpretation and comparative interpretation of cultures in both comparative literature and cultural anthropology. Reading of some very complex and influential works by such writers as Claude Lévi-Strauss, Amitav Ghosh, James Clifford, Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, and Erich Auerbach. Concurrently scheduled with course C287. P/NP or letter grading.

190. Research Colloquia in Comparative Literature. (2) Seminar, three hours. Designed to bring together students undertaking supervised tutorial research in seminar setting with one or more faculty members to discuss their own work or related work in discipline. Led by one supervising faculty member. May be repeated for credit. P/NP grading.

191. Variable Topics in Comparative Literature. (4) Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study and discussion of limited periods and specialized issues and approaches in literary theory, especially in relation to other modes of discourse such as history, philosophy, psychology, linguistics, anthropology. Development of culminating project required. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics to be offered in specific term. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

197. Individual Studies in Comparative Literature. (2 to 4) Tutorial, three hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Individual intensive study, with scheduled meetings to be arranged between faculty member and student. Assigned reading and tangible evidence of mastery of subject matter required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

198. Honors Research in Comparative Literature. (2 to 4) Tutorial, three hours. Limited to senior comparative literature honors students. Development and completion of honors thesis or comprehensive project on comparative topic selected by student and written under supervision of core faculty member. Students expected to meet regularly with supervisor throughout term. No more than one course may be used to fulfill four-course requirement for Comparative Literature majors. May be repeated once for maximum of 8 units. Individual contract required. Letter grading.

199. Directed Research or Senior Project in Comparative Literature. (2 to 4) Tutorial, three hours. Requisite: course 100. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be repeated for credit with consent of chair. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

 

Courses (Winter 2017)

Comparative Literature 2CW: Survey of Literature: Age of Enlightenment to 20th Century

Instructor: David MacFadyen

Study of selected texts from Age of Enlightenment to 20th century, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts may include works by authors such as Swift, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Goethe, Flaubert, Ibsen, Strindberg, M. Shelley, Dostoevsky, Kafka, James Joyce, Garcia Marquez, and Jamaica Kincaid. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

Comparative Literature 2DW: Survey of Literature: Great Books from World at Large

Instructor: Ali Behdad

Study of major literary texts usually overlooked in courses that focus only on canon of Western literature, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts from at least three of following areas read in any given term: African, Caribbean, East Asian, Latin American, and Middle Eastern literature. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

Comparative Literature 4CW: Literature and Writing: Age of Enlightenment to 20th Century

Instructor:

Study and discussion of selected texts from Age of Enlightenment to 20th century, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts may include works by authors such as Swift, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Goethe, M. Shelley, Flaubert, Ibsen, Strindberg, Dostoevsky, Gogol, Kafka, Joyce, Beckett, L. Hughes, and Garcia Marquez. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

Comparative Literature 4DW: Literature and Writing: Great Books from World at Large

Instructor:

Study and discussion of major literary texts usually overlooked in courses that focus only on canon of Western literature, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts from at least three of following areas read in any given term: African, Caribbean, East Asian, Latin American, and Middle Eastern literature. Texts may include works by authors such as Ngugi, Desai, Kincaid, Emecheta, El Saadawi, Achebe, Pak, Can Xue, Neruda, and Rushdie. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

Comparative Literature 98T: Do You Hear What I Do? Reading Sound and Sense through World Literature and Music

Instructor: Helga Zambrano

Freshmen/sophomores preferred. Questioning of supposedly arbitrary relationship between sound and sense. Using humanistic, musicological, and literary tools, interrogation of meaning of listening, thinking, and knowing. Examination of listening cultures in Latin America, U.S., Germany, Russia, Francophone Atlantic, and West Africa.

Comparative Literature 100: Introduction to Literary and Critical Theory

Instructor: Stephanie Bosch Santana

Seminar-style introduction to discipline of comparative literature presented through series of texts illustrative of its formation and practice.

Comparative Literature M101: Hebrew Literature in English: Literary Traditions of Ancient Israel — Bible and Apocrypha

Instructor: Jeremy D. Smoak

(Same as Jewish Studies M150A.) Study of literary culture of ancient Israel through examination of principal compositional strategies of Hebrew Bible and Apocrypha (read in translation).

Comparative Literature M110: Thousand and One Nights/Alf Layla Wa-Layla

Instructor: Susan E. Slyomovics

(Same as Arabic M110.) Knowledge of Arabic not required. Since its appearance in Europe in 1704, “Thousand and One Nights” is most well-known work of Arabic literature in West. Examination of cycle of tales more commonly known as “Arabian Nights,” including history of its translation, contemporary oral performances of tales in Arabic-speaking world, literary emergence of vernacular language in relation to classical Arabic, and Western appropriations of tales in music, film, and novels (Ravel, Rimsky-Korsakov, Barth, Poe, and Walt Disney).

Comparative Literature M166: Modern Jewish Literature in English: Diaspora Literature

Instructor: Saba Soomekh

(Same as Jewish Studies M151A.) Study of literary responses of Jews to modernity, its challenges, and threats. Readings in texts originally written in English or translated from Hebrew, Yiddish, German, Russian, French, and Italian. Analysis of formal aspects of each work.

Comparative Literature CM170: Alternate Traditions: In Search of Female Voices in Contemporary Literature

Instructor: Katherine King

(Same as Gender Studies CM170.) Designed for upper division literature majors. Investigation of narrative texts by contemporary French, German, English, American, Spanish American, African, and Asian women writers from cross-cultural perspective. Common themes, problems, and techniques.

Comparative Literature 180SL: Movement in Art, Philosophy, and Daily Life

Instructor: Hans Barnard

Exploration of relation between humans and world. This is often seen as function of brain, problematic hypothesis as brain is as ineffective without body as body is without its brain. Output of brain, irrespective of what may go on inside it, is control over movements. Central facility, identified as consciousness, integrates input and decides on course of action. Ownership and agency also result from systems that control movements. It is thus not “I think, therefore I am,” but “I move, therefore I am.” This rephrasing of Cartesian paradigm is central to study. Service learning integrates instruction with community service and students are required to devote at least 20 hours to off-campus service. To facilitate and follow discussions in class, students read one scientific article each week and watch one movie, and read three of seven novels. Students also conduct individual research project.

Comparative Literature 191 (Seminar 1): Islands of Power

Instructor: Kirstie McClure

Focus on island as rhetorical site or topos for social criticism and political reflection. Whether literal or figural, fact or fiction, topographically bounded space of island is easily analogized to boundedness of political regime; but can also be marshaled as figure for individual psyche. Exploration of this imagery across three literary genres: utopias, dystopias, and philosophical tales. Readings range from 16th to early 20th century: More’s Utopia, Voltaire’s Candide, Diderot’s Supplement to Bouganville’s Voyage, Bellamy’s Looking Backward, Zamiatin’s We, and Huxley’s Brave New World.

Comparative Literature 191 (Seminar 3): World Literature: Theories, Issues, and Debates

Instructor: Shu-mei Shih

Literary comparatists take as their objects of study literary works from all over world–unique characteristic that sets it apart from studies of national literatures as discreet entities in language and literature fields such as English, Nigerian, or Taiwanese. Despite early origin of term world literature, only in recent decades have scholars have begun to question and debate on parameters of world literature as specific category in sustained way. How is world literature defined? How is world in world literature defined? What should or should not be included in world literature? What are potentialities and limits of world literature as object of study? Is it possible to study entire corpus of world literature? What are some methods and theories of world literature? Exploration of these and other questions through critical reading of influential and innovative paradigms of world literature to date, with major focus on scholarly works of 21st century.

Comparative Literature 191 (Seminar 4): Anglophone African Literature in Comparative Contexts

Instructor: Stephanie Bosch Santana

Exploration of Anglophone African literature in global context, focusing on narratives that not only deal with experiences of travel and migration thematically, but also travel themselves–across genres, languages, and national borders inside and outside of Africa. Through study of texts including novels, short stories, newspaper and magazine fiction, and new digital narratives on Twitter and Facebook, students engage in broader debates around African literary studies in relation to postcolonial and world literatures. Focus on ways that various writers navigate relationship between English and other colonial, regional, and local languages. Authors may include Chimamanda Adichie, NoViolet Bulawayo, Zakes Mda, and Ngugi wa Thiong’o, among others.