Undergraduate Courses

  • For information about specific section times and locations  please view the UCLA Schedule of Classes.
  • For a complete listing of department courses visit the UCLA General Catalog.

Courses (Winter 2017)

Comparative Literature 2CW: Survey of Literature: Age of Enlightenment to 20th Century

Instructor: David MacFadyen

Study of selected texts from Age of Enlightenment to 20th century, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts may include works by authors such as Swift, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Goethe, Flaubert, Ibsen, Strindberg, M. Shelley, Dostoevsky, Kafka, James Joyce, Garcia Marquez, and Jamaica Kincaid. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

Comparative Literature 2DW: Survey of Literature: Great Books from World at Large

Instructor: Ali Behdad

Study of major literary texts usually overlooked in courses that focus only on canon of Western literature, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts from at least three of following areas read in any given term: African, Caribbean, East Asian, Latin American, and Middle Eastern literature. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

Comparative Literature 4CW: Literature and Writing: Age of Enlightenment to 20th Century

Instructor:

Study and discussion of selected texts from Age of Enlightenment to 20th century, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts may include works by authors such as Swift, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Goethe, M. Shelley, Flaubert, Ibsen, Strindberg, Dostoevsky, Gogol, Kafka, Joyce, Beckett, L. Hughes, and Garcia Marquez. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

Comparative Literature 4DW: Literature and Writing: Great Books from World at Large

Instructor:

Study and discussion of major literary texts usually overlooked in courses that focus only on canon of Western literature, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts from at least three of following areas read in any given term: African, Caribbean, East Asian, Latin American, and Middle Eastern literature. Texts may include works by authors such as Ngugi, Desai, Kincaid, Emecheta, El Saadawi, Achebe, Pak, Can Xue, Neruda, and Rushdie. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

Comparative Literature 98T: Do You Hear What I Do? Reading Sound and Sense through World Literature and Music

Instructor: Helga Zambrano

Freshmen/sophomores preferred. Questioning of supposedly arbitrary relationship between sound and sense. Using humanistic, musicological, and literary tools, interrogation of meaning of listening, thinking, and knowing. Examination of listening cultures in Latin America, U.S., Germany, Russia, Francophone Atlantic, and West Africa.

Comparative Literature 100: Introduction to Literary and Critical Theory

Instructor: Stephanie Bosch Santana

Seminar-style introduction to discipline of comparative literature presented through series of texts illustrative of its formation and practice.

Comparative Literature M101: Hebrew Literature in English: Literary Traditions of Ancient Israel — Bible and Apocrypha

Instructor: Jeremy D. Smoak

(Same as Jewish Studies M150A.) Study of literary culture of ancient Israel through examination of principal compositional strategies of Hebrew Bible and Apocrypha (read in translation).

Comparative Literature M110: Thousand and One Nights/Alf Layla Wa-Layla

Instructor: Susan E. Slyomovics

(Same as Arabic M110.) Knowledge of Arabic not required. Since its appearance in Europe in 1704, “Thousand and One Nights” is most well-known work of Arabic literature in West. Examination of cycle of tales more commonly known as “Arabian Nights,” including history of its translation, contemporary oral performances of tales in Arabic-speaking world, literary emergence of vernacular language in relation to classical Arabic, and Western appropriations of tales in music, film, and novels (Ravel, Rimsky-Korsakov, Barth, Poe, and Walt Disney).

Comparative Literature M166: Modern Jewish Literature in English: Diaspora Literature

Instructor: Saba Soomekh

(Same as Jewish Studies M151A.) Study of literary responses of Jews to modernity, its challenges, and threats. Readings in texts originally written in English or translated from Hebrew, Yiddish, German, Russian, French, and Italian. Analysis of formal aspects of each work.

Comparative Literature CM170: Alternate Traditions: In Search of Female Voices in Contemporary Literature

Instructor: Katherine King

(Same as Gender Studies CM170.) Designed for upper division literature majors. Investigation of narrative texts by contemporary French, German, English, American, Spanish American, African, and Asian women writers from cross-cultural perspective. Common themes, problems, and techniques.

Comparative Literature 180SL: Movement in Art, Philosophy, and Daily Life

Instructor: Hans Barnard

Exploration of relation between humans and world. This is often seen as function of brain, problematic hypothesis as brain is as ineffective without body as body is without its brain. Output of brain, irrespective of what may go on inside it, is control over movements. Central facility, identified as consciousness, integrates input and decides on course of action. Ownership and agency also result from systems that control movements. It is thus not “I think, therefore I am,” but “I move, therefore I am.” This rephrasing of Cartesian paradigm is central to study. Service learning integrates instruction with community service and students are required to devote at least 20 hours to off-campus service. To facilitate and follow discussions in class, students read one scientific article each week and watch one movie, and read three of seven novels. Students also conduct individual research project.

Comparative Literature 191 (Seminar 1): Islands of Power

Instructor: Kirstie McClure

Focus on island as rhetorical site or topos for social criticism and political reflection. Whether literal or figural, fact or fiction, topographically bounded space of island is easily analogized to boundedness of political regime; but can also be marshaled as figure for individual psyche. Exploration of this imagery across three literary genres: utopias, dystopias, and philosophical tales. Readings range from 16th to early 20th century: More’s Utopia, Voltaire’s Candide, Diderot’s Supplement to Bouganville’s Voyage, Bellamy’s Looking Backward, Zamiatin’s We, and Huxley’s Brave New World.

Comparative Literature 191 (Seminar 3): World Literature: Theories, Issues, and Debates

Instructor: Shu-mei Shih

Literary comparatists take as their objects of study literary works from all over world–unique characteristic that sets it apart from studies of national literatures as discreet entities in language and literature fields such as English, Nigerian, or Taiwanese. Despite early origin of term world literature, only in recent decades have scholars have begun to question and debate on parameters of world literature as specific category in sustained way. How is world literature defined? How is world in world literature defined? What should or should not be included in world literature? What are potentialities and limits of world literature as object of study? Is it possible to study entire corpus of world literature? What are some methods and theories of world literature? Exploration of these and other questions through critical reading of influential and innovative paradigms of world literature to date, with major focus on scholarly works of 21st century.

Comparative Literature 191 (Seminar 4): Anglophone African Literature in Comparative Contexts

Instructor: Stephanie Bosch Santana

Exploration of Anglophone African literature in global context, focusing on narratives that not only deal with experiences of travel and migration thematically, but also travel themselves–across genres, languages, and national borders inside and outside of Africa. Through study of texts including novels, short stories, newspaper and magazine fiction, and new digital narratives on Twitter and Facebook, students engage in broader debates around African literary studies in relation to postcolonial and world literatures. Focus on ways that various writers navigate relationship between English and other colonial, regional, and local languages. Authors may include Chimamanda Adichie, NoViolet Bulawayo, Zakes Mda, and Ngugi wa Thiong’o, among others.